Ludwig van beethoven - amadeus-quartett - streichquartette es-dur op. 74 und f-moll op. 95


Like all pianists of the late 18th century, Beethoven was raised on the sonatas and teachings of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach , the chief exponent of “expressive” music at a time when music was regarded as the art of pleasing sounds. These sonatas, with their quirks of rhythms and harmony and their occasional wordless recitative, were equally familiar to Haydn and Mozart; but in Beethoven they evoked a much readier response, not only for reasons of temperament but also because of the intellectual climate in which he himself was reared. The favourite literary fare of the Breunings and their friends was associated with the Sturm und Drang , a reaction against the rationalism of the early 18th century, an exaltation of feeling and instinct over reason. Its gospel was enshrined in Goethe’s early novel The Sorrows of Young Werther (1774), the language of which finds an echo in certain of Beethoven’s letters and especially in the “Heiligenstadt Testament” ( see below ).

The listings include all of these relevant identifiers. While other catalogues of Beethoven's works exist, the numbers here represent the most commonly used and widely known. Years in parentheses denote dates of composition or publication.

Very little is known about Beethoven’s childhood. He was baptized on December 17, 1770 and was probably born a few days before that. [1] [5] [6] [7] Beethoven's parents were Johann van Beethoven (1740 in Bonn – December 18, 1792) and Maria Magdalena Keverich (1744 in Ehrenbreitstein – July 17, 1787). Magdalena's father, Johann Heinrich Keverich, had been Chef at the court of the Archbishopric of Trier at Festung Ehrenbreitstein fortress opposite to Koblenz . [8] His father was a fairly unimportant musician who worked at the court of the Elector of Cologne . This court was in Bonn and it was here that he lived until he was a young man. His father gave him his first lessons in piano and violin . Beethoven was a child prodigy like Mozart , but while Mozart as a little boy was taken all over Europe by his father, Beethoven never traveled until he was 17. [9] By that time, his piano teacher was a man called Neefe who had learned the piano from Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach , the son of Johann Sebastian Bach . Neefe said to the Elector that the young Beethoven should be given the chance to travel, so he was allowed to go to Vienna . There, he might have had one or two lessons from Mozart, but then Beethoven got a letter saying that his mother was dying, so he hurried back to Bonn. [7] Soon his mother died, and Beethoven had to help to look after the family because his father had become an alcoholic . [7] Beethoven played the viola in the orchestra of the Elector, he started to compose, and made many friends. Some of these friends were musicians and others were very important people, many of them were aristocrats who would be able to help him in his career.


Ludwig van Beethoven - Amadeus-Quartett - Streichquartette Es-Dur Op. 74 und F-Moll Op. 95Ludwig van Beethoven - Amadeus-Quartett - Streichquartette Es-Dur Op. 74 und F-Moll Op. 95Ludwig van Beethoven - Amadeus-Quartett - Streichquartette Es-Dur Op. 74 und F-Moll Op. 95Ludwig van Beethoven - Amadeus-Quartett - Streichquartette Es-Dur Op. 74 und F-Moll Op. 95

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